As a thank-you gift for having read so far, please enjoy this gallery of friends and family who've survived terrible, terrible eyeglasses. 

What’s that, you say? Yours were worse? Send us a photo to prove it, and we’ll make you an honorary member of our little club. (And we’ll sign you up for the free Remarkable Life email newsletter!

(Note corresponding upload button should be added to Contact page. Button had to be deleted. Text was "Upload my terrible glasses!"; it appears in small Avenir Light, blue color.)

Former clients love Samantha!
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“She is talented and smart and professional.
I recommend her highly!”

—M.B., author

 

“Splendid job."

—W.C.H., author

 

“She’s unflappable, trustworthy, and smart. And she gets exactly what I want to say and makes me sound very smooth and articulate. She is the best.”

—N.S., executive director

 

“Best proofreader I ever had.”

—L.B., court reporter

 

“A talented editor/writer.”

—S.C., editor

Former clients love Susan!
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“The results were phenomenal.”

—J.G., editor

 

“It’s a visual feast—exciting and elegant—but never overwhelms the content.”

—J.C., personal historian

 

“Knowledgeable, completely invested

in the process, and intuitive.”

—J.G., personal historian

 

“I was thrilled. She is a pro, and a pleasure to work with.”

—S.R., author

 

“You have done a superb job, from the beginning of the book to the end.”

—M.G., author

CLIENT HALL OF FAME

Mitchell Batavia

A self-published memoirist looks back on an unusual
editorial partnership

About a year ago, Samantha was hired by Mitchell Batavia to prepare a memoir for publication. The author was his brother, Andrew I. Batavia, a lawyer and activist with quadriplegia, who was responsible for writing part of the historic Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990. Drew had died twelve years before. 

Mitchell (himself a professor and published author) and the Batavia family decided that the memoir should be published in time for the twenty-fifth anniversary of the ADA, as a way of honoring Drew’s memory. The project proceeded at a breakneck pace to meet its deadline—and succeeded!

Samantha recently reminisced with Mitchell about their shared accomplishment:

Samantha Shubert: Looking back, do you feel different about the process or about the book, different than when you started?

Mitchell Batavia: It was amazing. I think that was the advantage of self-publishing, to be able to just plow it through, with the help of people like you, of course. I’m happy that I got it out, and I feel satisfied a year later that it’s out there. It’s really— It’s like giving birth, and then you hope that it has a life of its own.

SS: When you started this, you had a certain mindset. You had goals and expectations and an emotional feeling about it.

MB: Once we published, it was silence for half a year. And it felt like: Was this a total waste of time? Is it just going to be family members that read this thing? And it’s only recently that the publishing company is doing their reports. And I get these emails once a month, and I’m surprised that I get these royalties! 

SS: [laughs]

MB: [laughs] The fact that there’s some business every month indicates that it may be taking on some traction. And that feels good. I just want people to read it, that’s all. I don’t care if they read it as a library book or whatever.

SS: Right, you just want it out there.

MB: And I feel very satisfied that we were able to finish the project. Would I have liked it to be a publishing company, instead of doing it myself? Well, I don’t know. I mean, I’ve learned a hell of a lot, doing it myself. I don’t need the status of finding a publishing house. I’ve done that already, and I feel, frankly, there’s almost no difference in the end product. You know, maybe they would have been able to get me a couple of mainstream reviews.

SS: You fixate on that. 

  

MB: I know I do! 

SS: Thinking about that crazy couple of weeks that we spent working on this, did you enjoy that?

MB: It was much harder doing that than writing it. I mean copyediting. I have a lot of respect for you. I mean, that is just [laughs], it’s just really— I don’t know what the word is. I’m sure you’ll come up with it. 

SS: [laughs] Tedious?

MB: Tedious, tedious! It’s really tedious, and fatiguing, and when you’re doing it under a deadline, you know, it really is hard. But it was amazing, it was a good team. I wasn’t alone, I had you, which was really very fortunate. 

 

Wisdom from a Chair: Thirty Years of Quadriplegia is available from Amazon.

Photo used with permission of Mitchell Batavia. 

Are you ready to start?

 

Sign up now for a free consultation about your memoir project. 

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© 2016 Remarkable Life Memoirs, LLC